Khartoum The Ultimate Imperial Adventure (NEW)

  • Paperback
  • 512
  • Khartoum The Ultimate Imperial Adventure
  • Michael Asher
  • English
  • 10 October 2020
  • 9780140258554

Michael Asher Å 6 Read & Download

Michael Asher Å 6 Read & Download Read õ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Å Michael Asher Free read Khartoum The Ultimate Imperial Adventure D 2 days too late The result was a national scandal that shocked the ueen and led to the fall of the British government Twelve years later it was the brilliant Herbert Kitchener who struck back Achieving the impossible he built a railway across the desert to transport his troops to the final devastating confrontation at Omdurman in 1898 Desert explorer and a. This is a historical period that has long interested me It covers the time between 1880 1898 in the Sudan I remember that as a young boy fascinated by maps I had been curious at the designation of the Anglo Egyptian Sudan on the map It was huge and the Nile flowed right through it I wondered how it had been both British and Egyptian As a college student of Asian civilizations I had done a large research project on the Taiping rebellion in China in the 19th Century and there found mention of a charismatic leader Charles Gordon who had helped end the conflict and seemed to be a principled and righteous British officer who often went against his orders and always did what he thought was right and usually acted to reduce the suffering of the people he was dealing with There was a mention there that he had died defending Khartoum in the Sudan My interest was raised and when I saw a trashy paperback in a bookstore I bought it and uickly read Gordon of Khartoum It was uite a fanciful retelling of the story of how Gordon was governor general of the Sudan when it was ruled by the Turks Egyptians British how he had worked to end the slave trade and eventually was reappointed elsewhere He was brought back to Khartoum to rescue the country from an Islamic fundamentalist leader the Mahdi expected one who would purify Islam or so the legend went Gordon had died defending the city because the relief column sent to rescue him arrived about 18 hours too late I knew it was largely history romanticized but I enjoyed it I certainly was not as aware as I am now so the story of a righteous Christian imperialist dying defending his beloved people appealed to me Later I saw the movie of the same name staring Charlton Heston which I instantly sensed was entertaining but a load of tripeAs I was browsing the bookstore shelves buying books for my trip to Mexico a very serious undertaking I saw this volume inspected it and bought it hoping that I would now have a historically accurate picture of the eventsAs usual I began by finding out about the author Some background information usually helps me ascertain my feelings about the text He had been a British military officer in the SAS and then had become an author achieving much success in many different types of writing He also was fascinated by this region of the world and had won awards for desert exploration in the Sudan from the Royal Geographic Society He lived in Sudan for ten years and spoke fluent Arabic He now lives in Kenya with his Arabist wife and two childrenThis text is in fact a very detailed retelling of the entire story from the original massacre of the Anglo Egyptian force under Hicks in 1883 by the Mahdi to the fall of Khartoum to the Mahdi including Gordon s death to the eventual capture of Khartoum by Kitchener in 1899 There are several interesting points about the text that are worth rememberingFirst it seems somewhat balanced A European will always tell such a story from a European perspective but he did try to balance the story He was very critical of the British officer corps for its lack of military competence its reward of chumminess over skill the purchase of commissions and its indifference and hostility to those who were part of the British Empire His indictment of many officers was specific and cutting These elements were interesting to me as they showed the arrogance of the British forces in specific detail with stories of specific officers and how they behaved He showed remarkable respect for the Sudanese people their various cultures and their tremendous survival skills He talks a lot about how the Beja specifically had been defeating invading armies since the time of the Pharaohs and had always been successful He specifically praises the skills and cleverness of the Haddendowa leaders Osman Digna a survivor who outlived it all His salute to the Sudanese as fighters also seems sincere whether for the courage of those fighting for the Mahdi and for the steadiness and reliability of the Sudanese and Egyptians who fought with the British His strongest indictment comes of the Turco Egyptian ruling class both in Sudan and Egypt as corrupt cowardly and self centered He seems to agree with Gordon that they were the roots of the problem there and that the people had good reason to rise up against them Asher s reliance on British sources is to be expected but he also seems to have used many Arabic sources as well as oral histories in telling the storySecond he saw the conflict as not exclusively religious The Mahdi provided a charismatic figure around which to rally and while many did so for religious reasons there were also many practical reasons to support this regime given the corruption and mismanagement of the Turco Egyptian government Many of the ethic groups had not rallied to the Mahdi but when the existing government collapsed and Gordon was killed they naturally rallied to the winning side Likewise when the Mahdi died soon after the fall of Khartoum the Islamist state introduced by his successor was a bit too harsh for them and fractures began to develop along ethnic linesThird the descriptions of the battles themselves are detailed and horrifying I wish I had read this as a boy and it might have cured me of some of the lingering military romanticism that it took me another ten years to eliminate His descriptions of steel on steel battles uite often the British steel failed and the movements of troops were also gripping The fact that many battles were over uickly but seemed like an eternity was fleshed out by substantial detail and comments written later by soldiers who survived His strongest salute was to the individual soldiers who showed courage and determination in the face of tremendous adversity both with the opponents and with the elementsFourth water was often the key Running around the desert with large military forces reuires water and it was often pivotal British forces that came upon a watering hole defended by forces of he Mahdi had no choice but to attack as did the Mahdi s successor near the end of the conflict The railroads that were built solved some of this problem but even they had to carry huge amounts of water to power the steam engines and at one point half of the train was carrying water for itself One interesting story is how a surveyor and water diviner brought in by the British actually found two new water supplies that were critical in assisting them cross a route no native would think could be usedFifth the book does a good job of setting the stage for the modern phase of Islamic fundamentalism without becoming too preachy This was one of the first truly Islamic states established and was the only colony to win independence by force of arms in Africa The agenda of the Mahdi and his regime very much set the stage for future Sudanese politics and the rise of Bashir in 1989 Osama bin Laden spent years in Sudan soaking up the teachings of the Mahdi and his modern followers It also documented the severe ethnic divides in the country that are being played out today in the crisis in Darfur I liked the way he made his point but let the reader draw his or her own conclusionsIt was a very good read and I would commend it to all persons of a serious bent Now that I have some additional solid information about the period I am perhaps ready to engage my colleague at the University of Vermont Darius Jonathan who is from Sudan as well as my friend Hassan Suleiman who I met in atar also a Sudanese Then I might really start learning May God Bless You Dear ueen and led to the fall of the British government Twelve years later it was the brilliant Herbert Kitchener who struck back Achieving the impossible he built a railway across the desert to transport his troops to the final devastating confrontation at Omdurman in 1898 Desert explorer and a. This is a historical period that has long interested me It covers the time between 1880 1898 in the Sudan I remember that as a young boy fascinated by maps I had been curious at the designation of the Anglo Egyptian Sudan on the map It was huge and the Nile flowed right through it I wondered how it had been both British and Egyptian As a college student of Asian civilizations I had done a large research project on the Taiping rebellion in China in the 19th Century and there found mention of a charismatic leader Charles Gordon who had helped end the conflict and seemed to be a principled and righteous British officer who often went against his orders and always did what he thought was right and The Sun that Rose from the Earth usually acted to reduce the suffering of the people he was dealing with There was a mention there that he had died defending Khartoum in the Sudan My interest was raised and when I saw a trashy paperback in a bookstore I bought it and Sonetos del Amor Oscuro ; Divan del Tamarit uickly read Gordon of Khartoum It was Cómo viajar sin ver uite a fanciful retelling of the story of how Gordon was governor general of the Sudan when it was ruled by the Turks Egyptians British how he had worked to end the slave trade and eventually was reappointed elsewhere He was brought back to Khartoum to rescue the country from an Islamic fundamentalist leader the Mahdi expected one who would purify Islam or so the legend went Gordon had died defending the city because the relief column sent to rescue him arrived about 18 hours too late I knew it was largely history romanticized but I enjoyed it I certainly was not as aware as I am now so the story of a righteous Christian imperialist dying defending his beloved people appealed to me Later I saw the movie of the same name staring Charlton Heston which I instantly sensed was entertaining but a load of tripeAs I was browsing the bookstore shelves buying books for my trip to Mexico a very serious Three Merchants of Bombay undertaking I saw this volume inspected it and bought it hoping that I would now have a historically accurate picture of the eventsAs Python of Pura Malai and Other Stories usually helps me ascertain my feelings about the text He had been a British military officer in the SAS and then had become an author achieving much success in many different types of writing He also was fascinated by this region of the world and had won awards for desert exploration in the Sudan from the Royal Geographic Society He lived in Sudan for ten years and spoke fluent Arabic He now lives in Kenya with his Arabist wife and two childrenThis text is in fact a very detailed retelling of the entire story from the original massacre of the Anglo Egyptian force SuperFreakonomics Global Cooling Patriotic Prostitutes and Why Suicide Bombers Should Buy Life Insurance under Hicks in 1883 by the Mahdi to the fall of Khartoum to the Mahdi including Gordon s death to the eventual capture of Khartoum by Kitchener in 1899 There are several interesting points about the text that are worth rememberingFirst it seems somewhat balanced A European will always tell such a story from a European perspective but he did try to balance the story He was very critical of the British officer corps for its lack of military competence its reward of chumminess over skill the purchase of commissions and its indifference and hostility to those who were part of the British Empire His indictment of many officers was specific and cutting These elements were interesting to me as they showed the arrogance of the British forces in specific detail with stories of specific officers and how they behaved He showed remarkable respect for the Sudanese people their various cultures and their tremendous survival skills He talks a lot about how the Beja specifically had been defeating invading armies since the time of the Pharaohs and had always been successful He specifically praises the skills and cleverness of the Haddendowa leaders Osman Digna a survivor who outlived it all His salute to the Sudanese as fighters also seems sincere whether for the courage of those fighting for the Mahdi and for the steadiness and reliability of the Sudanese and Egyptians who fought with the British His strongest indictment comes of the Turco Egyptian ruling class both in Sudan and Egypt as corrupt cowardly and self centered He seems to agree with Gordon that they were the roots of the problem there and that the people had good reason to rise The Malavikagnimitram of Kalidasa With the Commentary of Katayavema Various Readings Introduction Translation into English and Critical Explanatory notes up against them Asher s reliance on British sources is to be expected but he also seems to have Tocarnos la cara used many Arabic sources as well as oral histories in telling the storySecond he saw the conflict as not exclusively religious The Mahdi provided a charismatic figure around which to rally and while many did so for religious reasons there were also many practical reasons to support this regime given the corruption and mismanagement of the Turco Egyptian government Many of the ethic groups had not rallied to the Mahdi but when the existing government collapsed and Gordon was killed they naturally rallied to the winning side Likewise when the Mahdi died soon after the fall of Khartoum the Islamist state introduced by his successor was a bit too harsh for them and fractures began to develop along ethnic linesThird the descriptions of the battles themselves are detailed and horrifying I wish I had read this as a boy and it might have cured me of some of the lingering military romanticism that it took me another ten years to eliminate His descriptions of steel on steel battles Ensayos bonsai uite often the British steel failed and the movements of troops were also gripping The fact that many battles were over Sessiz Ev uickly but seemed like an eternity was fleshed out by substantial detail and comments written later by soldiers who survived His strongest salute was to the individual soldiers who showed courage and determination in the face of tremendous adversity both with the opponents and with the elementsFourth water was often the key Running around the desert with large military forces reuires water and it was often pivotal British forces that came Un Fichaje Inesperado ¡Gol #8 upon a watering hole defended by forces of he Mahdi had no choice but to attack as did the Mahdi s successor near the end of the conflict The railroads that were built solved some of this problem but even they had to carry huge amounts of water to power the steam engines and at one point half of the train was carrying water for itself One interesting story is how a surveyor and water diviner brought in by the British actually found two new water supplies that were critical in assisting them cross a route no native would think could be Ayodhya usedFifth the book does a good job of setting the stage for the modern phase of Islamic fundamentalism without becoming too preachy This was one of the first truly Islamic states established and was the only colony to win independence by force of arms in Africa The agenda of the Mahdi and his regime very much set the stage for future Sudanese politics and the rise of Bashir in 1989 Osama bin Laden spent years in Sudan soaking Principles For Personal Growth up the teachings of the Mahdi and his modern followers It also documented the severe ethnic divides in the country that are being played out today in the crisis in Darfur I liked the way he made his point but let the reader draw his or her own conclusionsIt was a very good read and I would commend it to all persons of a serious bent Now that I have some additional solid information about the period I am perhaps ready to engage my colleague at the University of Vermont Darius Jonathan who is from Sudan as well as my friend Hassan Suleiman who I met in atar also a Sudanese Then I might really start learning

Free read Khartoum The Ultimate Imperial AdventureKhartoum The Ultimate Imperial Adventure

Michael Asher Å 6 Read & Download Read õ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Å Michael Asher Free read Khartoum The Ultimate Imperial Adventure The British campaign in the Sudan in ueen Victoria's reign is an epic tale of adventure thrilling than any fiction The story begins with the massacre of the 11000 strong Hicks Pasha column in 1883 Sent to evacuate the country British hero General Gordon was surrounded and murdered in Khartoum by an army of dervishes led by the Mahdi The relief mission arrive. Very entertaining book that covers the two campaigns fought by the British in the Sudan in 1883 1885 and 1896 1898 Proclaiming himself the long expected Mahdi the Guided One of the Prophet Mohammed Ibn Admed el Sayyid Abdullah led a revolt of the Sudanese against their Egyptian occupiers It soon became abundantly clear the Egyptian Government which was essentially installed by the British after the Arabi Pasha revolt of 1882 was not capable of putting down the uprising Leery of being pulled into a war for a place of limited strategic value the British Government ultimately dispatched General Charles Gordon to Khartoum to oversee the evacuation of the Egyptian garrisons from the region although this being the ultimate imperial adventure Gordon s true intentions of what he hoped to accomplish in Khartoum remain a point of contention Gordon s attempted negotiations with the Mahdi were uickly rebuffed and he soon found himself trapped and surrounded by the dervish army This sets the stage for a desperate rescue attempt by a British relief column including a newly formed Camel Corp and gunboats working their way up the Nile it truly is a rollicking good adventure story Asher s account of that campaign and Kitchener s subseuent re conuest of the Sudan fifteen years later is insightful and engaging an excellent read about a fascinating subject La belle au bois dormant ueen Victoria's reign is an epic tale of adventure thrilling than any fiction The story begins with the massacre of the 11000 strong Hicks Pasha column in 1883 Sent to evacuate the country British hero General Gordon was surrounded and murdered in Khartoum by an army of dervishes led by the Mahdi The relief mission arrive. Very entertaining book that covers the two campaigns fought by the British in the Sudan in 1883 1885 and 1896 1898 Proclaiming himself the long expected Mahdi the Guided One of the Prophet Mohammed Ibn Admed el Sayyid Abdullah led a revolt of the Sudanese against their Egyptian occupiers It soon became abundantly clear the Egyptian Government which was essentially installed by the British after the Arabi Pasha revolt of 1882 was not capable of putting down the No Breaking My Heart Barefoot William Beach #5 uprising Leery of being pulled into a war for a place of limited strategic value the British Government A Biography of Innovations ultimately dispatched General Charles Gordon to Khartoum to oversee the evacuation of the Egyptian garrisons from the region although this being the Ni arte ni parte ultimate imperial adventure Gordon s true intentions of what he hoped to accomplish in Khartoum remain a point of contention Gordon s attempted negotiations with the Mahdi were Ni arte ni parte uickly rebuffed and he soon found himself trapped and surrounded by the dervish army This sets the stage for a desperate rescue attempt by a British relief column including a newly formed Camel Corp and gunboats working their way Noticias De Los Montoneros up the Nile it truly is a rollicking good adventure story Asher s account of that campaign and Kitchener s subseuent re conuest of the Sudan fifteen years later is insightful and engaging an excellent read about a fascinating subject

Read õ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Å Michael Asher

Michael Asher Å 6 Read & Download Read õ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB Å Michael Asher Free read Khartoum The Ultimate Imperial Adventure Uthor Michael Asher has reconstructed this classic tale in vivid detail Having covered every inch of the ground and examined all eyewitness reports he brings to bear new evidence uestioning several accepted aspects of the story The result is an account that sheds new light on the most riveting tale of honour courage revenge and savagery of late Victorian tim. This was a great and fairly balanced despite than occasional flashes of old school gung ho rah rah type British patriotism style telling of both of the Mahdist Wars between the British some Sudanese and Egyptians on one side and most Sudanese following the self declared Mahdi on the other The details from the battles is particularly great and as fun and shocking to read as if they had been written in narrative fictionThe only potential drawback is that this book did not include the non Anglo Egyptian involved Mahdist wars such as the skirmishes with the Italians in Eritrea or most interesting of all the large pell mel war fought between Sudan and Ethiopia In one of the battles there Meneilik II defeated the Mahdists before then going on to defeat the Italians later on These actions could have been included to show just the scope of events in the Sudan during the late 19th Century